Archive for January, 2011

Reflections on Cuba

January 27, 2011
Reflections on Cuba

This past Saturday, I returned home from a two week trip studying urban food production in Cuba with the Hunter College Urban Affairs and Planning Program. Urban agriculture in Cuba took off in the early 1990s- known as the Special Period– after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The loss of its dominant trading partner […]

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Got a Minute? Give a Minute!

January 26, 2011
Got a Minute? Give a Minute!

And post your idea on how to make NYC’s neighborhoods greener…in May. Give a Minute is a web based civil engagement application that allows people to submit ideas about a certain topic.  It acts as a huge digital white board where all ideas are posted on virtual post-its.  Viewers can see these ideas, share them […]

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Re-Using Your Kitchen Scraps

January 25, 2011
Re-Using Your Kitchen Scraps

And no, it doesn’t require worms. Not everyone loves composting as it turns out. Shocking to me, because I like the living lab component to my kitchen and I think the alternate option of bringing food scraps to your local community garden is a nice thing to do. But now there are new opportunities to […]

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High Performance Parks

January 19, 2011
High Performance Parks

The Design Trust for Public Space and the Parks Department have published a new book entitled, High Performance Landscape Guidelines:  21st Century Parks for NYC. The first primer of its type ever produced in the nation, it covers important issues regarding the art of sustainable place making, with regard to parks and open space.  It […]

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A Time Capsule of Black History, Rediscovered and Preserved in New York

January 18, 2011
A Time Capsule of Black History, Rediscovered and Preserved in New York

It’s hard to imagine any inch of New York City that hasn’t been scrutinized, glorified, surveyed, bought, and sold. But only 42 years ago, in 1968, Pratt Institute Professor Jim Hurley discovered three buildings in Brooklyn completely off the grid. He was in a helicopter, preparing for his urban studies course when he spotted three ancient houses along a forgotten alley. It looked like a little farm airlifted from Middle America. Instead, it was an improbably intact remnant of Weeksville, the country’s first community of free, black Americans.

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